Definition of NEUROTIC

of, relating to, constituting, or affected with neurosis… See the full definition

neurotic


adjective


Save Word


neu·​rot·​ic


|



nu̇-ˈrä-tik



,


nyu̇-

Definition of

neurotic

(Entry 1 of 2)



:

of, relating to, constituting, or affected with neurosis (see


neurosis


)

neurotic


noun


neu·​rot·​ic


|



nu̇-ˈrä-tik



,


nyu̇-

Definition of

neurotic

(Entry 2 of 2)


1



:

one affected with a neurosis (see


neurosis


)


2



:

an emotionally unstable individual

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Other Words from

neurotic

Adjective


neurotically


nu̇-​ˈrä-​ti-​k(ə-​)lē



,


nyu̇-​



adverb

Examples of

neurotic

in a Sentence


Adjective


This most fastidious of pianists sounds anything but

neurotic

when he plays Mozart.



— Richard Coles

,


Times Literary Supplement

,

15 Nov. 2002


Maybe it’s because novelists don’t talk much about each other. Maybe this is because novelists secrete a certain BO which only other novelists detect, like certain buzzards who emit a repellent pheromone detectable only by other buzzards, which is to say that only a novelist can know how

neurotic

, devious, underhanded a novelist can be.



— Walker Percy

,

“An Interview With Zoltán Abádi-Nagy,”


1987

,


in

Signposts in a Strange Land


,

1991



In our own time, the most perfect examples of such biography … are the matchless case-histories of Freud. Freud here shows, with absolute clarity, that the on-going nature of

neurotic

illness and its treatment cannot be displayed except by biography.



— Oliver Sacks

,


Awakenings

,

(1973) 1990


The psychiatrist diagnosed the patient as

neurotic

.


My

neurotic

mother scolded me for staying out 10 minutes past curfew.


He is

neurotic

about his job.


Noun


More than any rebirth, one senses in the England of 1911 a civilization’s unconscious death wish, vividly present in the author’s glimpses of the poet Rupert Brooke, that squeaky-clean

neurotic

, a casualty waiting to happen.



— Thomas Mallon

,


New York Times Book Review

,

27 May 2007


As a claustrophobe—perhaps the only kind of

neurotic

out of place in New York—I find nothing in the city more terrifying than a stalled subway car.



— John Tierney

,


New York Times Magazine

,

19 Mar. 1995


You are too much something for a tubercular

neurotic

who can only be jealous and mean and perverse.



— F. Scott Fitzgerald

,

letter

,

2 Dec. 1939


He was diagnosed as a

neurotic

.


He is a

neurotic

about keeping his clothes neat.


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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective


The often cringe-inducing chronicle of the aspiring,

neurotic

rapper who can’t stop oversharing about his underwhelming qualities is slated to return on June 16 at 10 p.m. on FXX with two episodes and stream the next day on FX on Hulu.




Gil Kaufman,

Billboard

, “Season Two of Lil Dicky’s ‘Dave’ to Feature Lil Nas X, Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner,” 20 Apr. 2021


Josh Thomas’ feel good Freeform comedy returns to screens April 8 with more antics from

neurotic

twentysomething Nicholas (played by Thomas), and his teenage half-sisters Genevieve (Maeve Press) and Matilda (Kayla Cromer).




Ruth Kinane,

EW.com

, “Josh Thomas on whether everything’s gonna be okay on season 2 of Everything’s Gonna Be Okay,” 7 Apr. 2021


Too bookish and restrained for mainstream pop, too

neurotic

for punk, and too bright and structured for post-punk.




Brady Gerber,

Vulture

, “Creation Records, the Label History Loves to Overlook,” 29 Mar. 2021


Take, for example, Gus, who resided at the Central Park Zoo and became the beloved mascot of New Yorkers due to his

neurotic

tendencies.




Katherine Cusumano,

Outside Online

, “How Polar Bears Became Avatars for the Climate Crisis,” 28 Mar. 2021


People who experience prolonged episodes of job insecurity are at risk of becoming less agreeable, less conscientious, and more

neurotic

, according to new research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.




Mark Travers,

Forbes

, “Chronic Job Insecurity Can Change Your Personality, According To New Research,” 19 Mar. 2021


Some of that came from humanity’s glorious sense of pluck — our need and amazing (or

neurotic

) ability to find the good in the bad.





Los Angeles Times

, “Column: We can finally see the end of the pandemic. We just need to not implode before we get there,” 11 Mar. 2021


Many people have an idea of a predator as a man who is dominant and aggressive, but Allen built his career on being insecure and

neurotic

.




Alia E. Dastagir,

USA TODAY

, “Woody Allen is being tried in the court of public opinion but cancel culture has its flaws,” 25 Feb. 2021


Like Wilson, Lurie doesn’t just invite you into his

neurotic

headspace.




John Semley,

The New Republic

, “Painting With John Perfects the Art of Instruction,” 5 Feb. 2021


Recent Examples on the Web: Noun


Seinfeld, which stars Jerry Seinfeld as a fictionalized version of himself, pokes fun at

neurotics

like Seinfeld and his friends, who overthink and worry about too many little things.




Nina Huang,

EW.com

, “What to quaran-stream on Hulu if you’re running out of shows to watch,” 1 May 2020


Learn about the connection between

neurotics

and Brexit.




Lacy Schley,

Discover Magazine

, “The Psychology of Politics,” 15 June 2018


But economy-class

neurotics

will have to make do while their shrink answers emails or knits cardigans during their sessions.




Joe Queenan,

WSJ

, “Pay Up if You Want to Eat Premium Bananas,” 11 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word ‘neurotic.’ Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors.

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First Known Use of

neurotic

Adjective

1866, in the meaning defined

above

Noun

1896, in the meaning defined at

sense 1

History and Etymology for

neurotic

Adjective

Noun

derivative of

neurotic

entry

1

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Learn More about

neurotic

From the Editors at Merriam-Webster

Dictionary Entries near

neurotic


neurospongium


neurospora


neurosurgery


neurotic


neuroticism


neurotoid


neurotoxic


See More Nearby Entries

Statistics for

neurotic

Last Updated

28 Apr 2021


Look-up Popularity

Cite this Entry

“Neurotic.”

Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary

, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/neurotic. Accessed 1 May. 2021.

Style:

MLA


MLA



Chicago



APA



Merriam-Webster

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More Definitions for

neurotic

neurotic



adjective

English Language Learners Definition of

neurotic

(Entry 1 of 2)


medical



:

having or suggesting neurosis



:

often or always fearful or worried about something

:

tending to worry in a way that is not healthy or reasonable

neurotic



noun

English Language Learners Definition of

neurotic

(Entry 2 of 2)


medical



:

a person who has a neurosis



:

a person who is always fearful or worried about something


See the full definition for

neurotic

in the English Language Learners Dictionary

neurotic


adjective


neu·​rot·​ic


|



n(y)u̇-ˈrät-ik


Medical Definition of

neurotic

(Entry 1 of 2)


1


a



:

of, relating to, or involving the nerves

a

neurotic

disorder


b



:

being a

neurosis


:



nervous



a

neurotic

disease


2



:

affected with, relating to, or characterized by neurosis

a

neurotic

person

Other Words from

neurotic


neurotically


-​i-​k(ə-​)lē



adverb

neurotic


noun

Medical Definition of

neurotic

(Entry 2 of 2)


1



:

one affected with a

neurosis


2



:

an emotionally unstable individual

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neurotic

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neurotic

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neurotic

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neurotic

for Arabic Speakers

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